Why Gaza’s Water Crisis Cannot Be Depoliticised

Emma Faverio A strip of land where 97% of the water has been deemed unpotable. Where citizens must pay exorbitant market prices for bottled water in order to fulfil their basic needs. Where those who cannot afford it, being the majority due to skyrocketing unemployment rates, have to resort to contaminated water. Where the quality…

Poverty Is a Human Rights Issue

Devisha Vythelingum Poverty is a microcosmic representation of a State’s treatment of its citizens. Being a transnational problem, it does not discriminate between what the international community sees as ‘rich’ and ‘poor’ countries, but exists everywhere, with varying degree of severity across States. Poverty is also not disconnected from human rights. It impacts on the…

Public Stigmatisation: LGBTQ+ in Asia

Samuel Ching Growing up in Hong Kong, I am used to living in a fairly conservative culture. Many people, particularly teenagers, avoid alcohol. The thinking goes: if you drink alcohol, you are a bad guy. And they avoid clubbing altogether, thinking there is no point to jumping up and down to music. But what really…

A History of American anti-Semitism and its Currents in the Trump Era

Skye Graham-Welton Last month we saw the deadliest attack on Jews in American history. Robert D. Bowers walked into Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life synagogue and opened fire on congregants as he yelled, “All Jews must die!” Bowers is so far right that he has refused to support President Donald Trump on the grounds that he…

Mohammed Bin Salman and the Guise of the Reformer

Emma Faverio Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman (MBS) was supposed to be the Middle Eastern reformer the West had been waiting for. Since his power grab in 2017, the Western media has depicted Salman as the young and charismatic figure who would finally modernise Saudi Arabia; some journalists even went so far as…

Chernobyl 2.0 – A Real Danger or An Irrational Fear?

Dani Podgoretskaya As the Belarussian government finishes construction of the controversial Ostrovets Nuclear Power Plant, multiple international experts express their concerns over the project. The Lithuanian energy minister, Zygimantas Vaiciunas, even went as far as calling the project “a threat to our national security, public health, and the environment.” Photo: Ostrovets is to Vinyus as Heathrow…

Syria: A Humanitarian Catastrophe

Natalie Chu In the middle of March this year Syria entered its eighth year of conflict. At this point the crisis has outlasted the second world war by more than 2 years and continues to escalate with ever-growing ferocity. For millions of Syrians, daily life has become a marathon of unparalleled suffering.   A Brief…

The CPTPP: A Good Deal for New Zealand?

Samuel J. Heath In March of this year the New Zealand government took the controversial decision of signing the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans Pacific Partnership. The CPTPP, in essence a rehashing of the original TPP edited to reflect the withdrawal of the United States, represents a major economic – and geopolitical – evolution for both…

Human Rights Day 2017: A Broken World can be Fixed

Ben Cartwright and Ellioté Long UCL Amnesty Society I have previously written in this journal about the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights and its modern relevance; whilst some of its values may seem anachronistic, and others far from achievable in the current world, it is one of the few positive visions of the future…

Same-Sex Marriage Revisited: Australia

Samuel Heath Political Science and Government Student, Dartmouth College On Wednesday, 15th November, we found out the results of a postal survey in which Australians had their say on whether or not the law should be altered to allow same-sex couples to marry. Australians voted in favour of the change, and a bill to amend…

A Heart of Darkness: The Chilcot Report a Year On

James Witherspoon UCL LAWS “It’s a way we had over here for living with ourselves. We cut ‘em in half with a machine gun and gave ‘em a Band-Aid. It was a lie. And the more I saw them, the more I hated lies” -Willard, Apocalypse Now  Travelling up the thick, dark vein of the…

Bordados por la Paz y la Memoria – Embroideries for Peace and Memory.

Ellioté Long Culture Editor Every Sunday afternoon, in the main square of Mexico City’s Coyoacán neighbourhood, you can find a group sitting to one side of the fountains, embroidering handkerchiefs. They are Fuentes Rojas (Red Fountains), the Mexico City branch of a global network of collectives embroidering for peace and memory. Members of these collectives…