Chernobyl 2.0 – A Real Danger or An Irrational Fear?

Dani Podgoretskaya As the Belarussian government finishes construction of the controversial Ostrovets Nuclear Power Plant, multiple international experts express their concerns over the project. The Lithuanian energy minister, Zygimantas Vaiciunas, even went as far as calling the project “a threat to our national security, public health, and the environment.” Photo: Ostrovets is to Vinyus as Heathrow…

Syria: A Humanitarian Catastrophe

Natalie Chu In the middle of March this year Syria entered its eighth year of conflict. At this point the crisis has outlasted the second world war by more than 2 years and continues to escalate with ever-growing ferocity. For millions of Syrians, daily life has become a marathon of unparalleled suffering.   A Brief…

The CPTPP: A Good Deal for New Zealand?

Samuel J. Heath In March of this year the New Zealand government took the controversial decision of signing the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans Pacific Partnership. The CPTPP, in essence a rehashing of the original TPP edited to reflect the withdrawal of the United States, represents a major economic – and geopolitical – evolution for both…

Human Rights Day 2017: A Broken World can be Fixed

Ben Cartwright and Ellioté Long UCL Amnesty Society I have previously written in this journal about the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights and its modern relevance; whilst some of its values may seem anachronistic, and others far from achievable in the current world, it is one of the few positive visions of the future…

Same-Sex Marriage Revisited: Australia

Samuel Heath Political Science and Government Student, Dartmouth College On Wednesday, 15th November, we found out the results of a postal survey in which Australians had their say on whether or not the law should be altered to allow same-sex couples to marry. Australians voted in favour of the change, and a bill to amend…

A Heart of Darkness: The Chilcot Report a Year On

James Witherspoon UCL LAWS “It’s a way we had over here for living with ourselves. We cut ‘em in half with a machine gun and gave ‘em a Band-Aid. It was a lie. And the more I saw them, the more I hated lies” -Willard, Apocalypse Now  Travelling up the thick, dark vein of the…

Bordados por la Paz y la Memoria – Embroideries for Peace and Memory.

Ellioté Long Culture Editor Every Sunday afternoon, in the main square of Mexico City’s Coyoacán neighbourhood, you can find a group sitting to one side of the fountains, embroidering handkerchiefs. They are Fuentes Rojas (Red Fountains), the Mexico City branch of a global network of collectives embroidering for peace and memory. Members of these collectives…

Privacy v Security: The sacrifices we’re all making

How the Investigatory Powers Act entrenched highly intrusive digital surveillance in the UK with barely an eyebrow raised Surya Kumaravel UCL Law Graduate It’s been a tumultuous few years in UK politics, with a lot of attention being given to the massive issues surrounding Brexit and the drama of political infighting in both major political…

Five Songs that reflect the Trump Era

Ellioté Long Culture Editor Nina Simone once said that it is an artist’s duty to reflect the times, and her affirmation is as important today as it ever was. Since the early days of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, we have seen some excellent responses to the racism, misogyny, trans-misogyny, ableism, islamophobia, homophobia and other rubbish…

Election expectations and reality: how human rights are affected

Ben Cartwright, UCL Amnesty Society President The 2017 general election was widely expected to be Theresa May’s way of obtaining a landslide majority and giving her an opportunity to transform Britain and its human rights legal framework. However, after the results came in and Britain faced a hung Parliament, the Conservatives’ ability to change Britain…